A voice for bioregional sustainability, education and culture

Home | Recent Posts | Library | Xchange Store | Winter Olympics | Contact Us | Volunteer | Site Map | Donate!

Reports from the Bioregional Education Classes of the
Eco-Ecuador Project 

2011 

Index to Set 1

  • Bioregionalismo 2011, Report 1,  Ramon Cedeño Loor-~-English-~-Spanish 
  • Bioregionalismo 2011, May, Report 1, Margarita Avila Napa-~-English-~-Spanish
  • Bioregionalismo 2011, June, Report 1, David Mera Villareal-~-English-~-Spanish

Note: Click on photos for larger image

Ramon Cedeño
Director, Bioregional Education Program
Planet Drum Foundation
Bioregionalismo Report #1, 2011

Another year of Bioregionalismo class commences. This year we are working with three educational institutions: the girls school Juan Pio Montúfar, Genesis high school, and the national high school Fanny de Baird, with whom we worked last year. There are three new class assistants, two students from last year: Noemi and Luis, and an assistant teacher from Genesis. We also have a new professor, David Mera, a natural sciences teacher from Fanny. And of course there’s Margarita Avila Napa a professor from last year, and me.


Ramon during an explanation about bioregions. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.

I am teaching the group of girls from the Montúfar School. We have received complete support from the faculty to proceed with the after school environmental education classes. It’s a new year for new experiences and for me that means leading a group of 11 year old girls. They are very little, but have lots of energy.


Nicole, a student from Montufar, and Noemi, her class 
assistant, who was a Bioregionalism student in 2010. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen

The first week was about introductions. I explained to them the different topics of the education program and that our goal is to teach the students to have better lifestyles and to learn how to live in harmony with nature. There will be a lot for them to learn, but they are motivated to help the environment. With the help of my assistant, Noemi, we split the class into work groups. During the fieldtrip on Friday at the Cross Lookout, we were able to observe in person the characteristics of our bioregion. I can tell that the girls in my group are already bonding into a special group of bioregionalistas.


Ramon teaching from the Bioregionismo 
booklet. 

 

Photo by Clay Plager-Unger.


Michelle Jensen, a Planet Drum volunteer, participates in a class with the Montufar group. 

 

Photo by Clay Plager-Unger.


Michelle and Andrea Menecez.

Michelle and the girls from Montufar School.

Michelle in the park with Vivian Emperatriz and Robin 
Chila.

The next week, we conversed about the different ecological projects which have been implemented in our city, including our education program, led by Planet Drum, which also has a project for revegetating hillsides. 


Orlando goes over class materials with a group 
of students from the Montufar school. 

 

Photo by Clay Plager-Unger.

I asked them a question: if they knew Peter Berg? They said no. So I gave Orlando, who is helping with all three groups, a mission: to borrow Peter’s book from the Planet Drum house so that we could at least present a picture of him to the students. And that’s why Orlando borrowed the book.


Montufar students during class. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


Elizeth Vera Mera and Shirley Farias during class. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


Ramon helps Elizeth Vera Mera present to Montufar group 
during class in the park. 

 

Photo by Clay Plager-Unger.

On Friday we went to the Lookout in Bellavista with all of the students from the three groups at once. Orlando, a resident of that neighborhood explained about the different projects that have happened there. He was a big help, as always. I talked about the trees that Planet Drum has been planting there for the past six years. Then Nicole, Orlando’s daughter, who happens to be a student in my group, showed the other students the organic garden that is being built there.


The Montufar group on its way to the Bellavista neighborhood. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen. 


Ramon and his class at the lookout up on the hill in 
Bellavista. Photo by Michelle Jensen.

Michelle and Ramon’s class.

The third week we learned about the ten steps to protect a bioregion. All of the girls in my group come every time, and two boys have shown up as well, resulting in a total of 23 students so far. Juan Ramón, one of the boys, is the most attentive and answers all of the questions very quickly. There is supposed to be a limit to the number of students in each group, but every week more students show up to my class and its hard to say no because they show so much motivation to participate. For homework for Friday, I told them to bring a bottle of water to the class because we were going to be watering trees.

On Friday we met in the park as always. All of my students showed up with bottles of water. One girl even brought some little mango trees to transplant. 



 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.

Our destination was ‘The Forest Amidst the Ruins,’ on the way we passed by the Planet Drum house and picked up more trees to transplant and tools. We were accompanied by three Peace Corps volunteers and all of the Planet Drum volunteers: Jack, Chris, Dennis, Guillem, and Michelle. It was very beautiful to see how free the children felt running around on the trails in the park. Thanks to the Planet Drum volunteers for helping to clean up the trails that week! The children ran, yelled and jumped up and down. I told them the history of that place and what happened during the El Niño Phenomenon. Then we planted all of the trees we had brought in the ground.


Nina Beatriz Villagran Cox tries digging a hole for 
planting trees. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


Estefano Davila Villavicencio plants a tree in the ‘Bosque 
en Medio de las Ruinas’ (The Forest amidst the Ruins) park during a fieldtrip. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


Eduardo Davila Delgado and Martin Elias Loor Patiño 
planting a tree in the ‘Ruinas’ park. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.

During the fourth week, the students had to show what they had learned so far by taking a bioregionlism exam. The results were really good and this gave me a motivational boost because these children are part of a new generation. That day we had invited a special guest, Felipe Sanchez, a survivor from the El Niño Phenomenon. All three groups sat in a large circle in the middle of the park to listen to him. Felipe gave a presentation of his experience during the phenomenon. He told us that rivers formed where there were none and how they rescued people who used to live on the hillside that is now ‘The Forest Amidst the Ruins.’ He explained that all of the houses that were there were completely destroyed. It was a very animated speech and a great experience for the children.


Don Felipe Sanchez presents what it was like to survive 
the El Niño Phenomenon to all three Bioregionalism students in the park. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


David and his students watch intently. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


Don Felipe Sanchez gives a very animated presentation. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.

On Friday we took a hike from Leonidas Plaza to Bellaca beach. As we walked over the long hill, the students took the form of a great column. Since all of the students wore their dark green Bioregionista tee-shirts, it was very cool to see. Noemi took the lead at the head of the column with the girls from Montúfar School. David, Orlando, Margarita and I took up the rear with the girls from the Fanny group who were walking more slowly. Since the hike goes past one of the garbage dumps, all of students were shocked to see so much trash. But in the end they had a good time and got to swim in the ocean.

Ramón Cedeño
Director Programa de Educación Bioregional
Fundación Planet Drum
Bahía de Caráquez, Ecuador

Translated by Clay

[Top]

<<<<><><>>>>

Ramon Cedeño
Director Programa Bioregionalismo
Fundación Planet Drum
Bahía de Caráquez, Ecuador
Informe #1


Empezamos un nuevo año de educación bioregional, este año con la colaboración de tres instituciones educativas: la escuela de niñas Juan Pio Montúfar, colegio Génesis y el colegio Nacional Fanny de Baird con quien se firmo un convenio el año pasado un convenio para realizar el programa de educación bioregional, además de tener nuevos asistentes Noemí, Luis y profesor David Mera que trabaja con el grupo del Fanny de Baird ya que el es el profesor del mismo colegio.

Este año estoy trabajando con las niñas de la escuela Montúfar, donde hay un apoyo total de parte de las autoridades de la institución.

Es un nuevo año para adquirir una nueva experiencia, trabajar con un grupo de niñas de 11 años. Son muy pequeñas y con mucha energía. La primera semana hablamos sobre en que consistía este proyecto y lo que queremos que ellas aprendan para llevar un mejor estilo de vida además de aprender a vivir en armonía con la naturaleza. Hay cosas que desconocen pero como ellas decían están aquí para cuidar el medio ambiente. Hemos formado grupo de trabajos con la participación activa de Noemí, quien es mi asistente, pero que por su estatura se confunde con las niñas. Durante el recorrido el día viernes, observamos las características de la bioregión desde el mirador la cruz. Es bueno saber que ellas a pesar de que no tenemos mucho tiempo han logrado hacer un gran grupo.

Departimos sobre los diferentes proyectos que se han implementado en nuestra ciudad y que uno de ellos es el programa de educación ambiental, además de los programas de reforestación que hace la misma fundación Planet Drum y la participación activa que esta tiene en la ciudad. Les hice una pregunta: si conocían a Peter Berg, y me dijeron que no. Y como tenemos un ayudante que siempre está con nosotros, nuestro amigo Orlando. Le dejamos una misión de que como no lo conocen si lo presentaríamos en foto. Es por eso que el prestó el libro, y lo conocieron por foto.

El día viernes, fuimos al mirador de Bellavista con un gran grupo de estudiantes. Nuestro amigo Orlando habló sobre los proyectos que se han realizado en el barrio. Nos ayudó como siempre. Hablé un poco sobre los árboles que fueron plantados ahí por Heather y los voluntarios de Planet Drum hace 6 años. Después, Nicole llevó al grupo a observar el huerto orgánico que se están construyendo en unas terrazas en la misma comunidad.

En la tercera semana, nos toco analizar los diez pasos para proteger una bioregión. Todas las chicas quieren participar y por la gran cantidad de niñas y dos chicos en total hacen 23 bioregionalistas solo en mi grupo. Juan Ramón es uno de los chicos mas activos del grupo y aunque él es de otra institución educativa siempre está contestando rápidamente a las preguntas. Teníamos un cupo limitado de estudiantes, pero todas las semanas a mi clase llegan nuevas personas que quiere ingresar y los dejo participar por que esas personas también tienen ganas de formar parte del grupo. Antes de salir les dije al grupo que dirijo que deben llevar agua por que plantaremos árboles el día del recorrido.

El viernes nos reunimos en el parque como siempre. Vi llegar a cada una de los estudiantes con una poma de agua para regar los árboles. Unas de ellas traían arbolitos de mango de sus casas para sembrarlos. Pasando por la casa de Planet Drum, recogimos más árboles y herramientas. Después nos dirigimos al Bosque en Medio de las Ruinas. Nos acompañaron tres voluntarios del Cuerpo de Paz y todos los voluntarios de Planet Drum: Jack, Chris, Dennis, Guillem, y Michelle. Fue muy hermoso ver como los chicos se sentían libres en los senderos que fueron habilitados durante la semana de trabajo de voluntarios de la fundación. Los estudiantes corrían, gritaban, y saltaban. Yo les relaté la historia del lugar y que paso con el desastre durante en el fenómeno del Niño. Luego plantamos todos los arbolitos que habíamos llevado.

En la cuarta semana donde los estudiantes tenían que decir todo lo que aprendieron durante las primeras semanas. El resultado fue muy bueno y esto me motiva más por que estos jóvenes son parte de una nueva generación. Este día fue invitado el señor Felipe Sánchez, una de las personas que sobrevivió el fenómeno del Niño. Nos sentamos en un círculo grande con la escuela Montúfar y Fanny de Baird. Felipe nos relató su experiencia de como se formaron ríos donde no habían y como rescataron personas que vivían donde ahora es en el Bosque en Medio de la Ruinas. Nos contó que todas las casas que existieron en ese lugar desaparecieron. Fue una buena experiencia para los estudiantes.

El día viernes todos los grupos nos dirigimos a Playa Gringa. Éramos una gran columna de estudiantes con un solo color de camisetas. Noemí encabezo la columna con las niñas de la escuela Montúfar. El profesor David, Orlando, Margarita y yo estábamos atrás con unas de las niñas del colegio Fanny que iban más despacio. Cuando llegamos, se me acercaron los jóvenes y me dijeron sobre la gran cantidad de basura que vieron en el recorrido.

Ramón Cedeño
Director Programa de Educación Bioregional
Fundación Planet Drum
Bahía de Caráquez, Ecuador

[Top]

<<<<><><>>>> 

Planet Drum Foundation
Bioregional Education Program
Report #1, May 2011
Teacher: Margarita Avila Napa

Today is the first day of the Bioregionalism classes. We are beginning a new adventure this year. I am working with the students from the Genesis School. They are between 13 and 15 years old, so they are already adolescents. They are from two different grades at Genesis. And they are a great group! Why are they so great? They integrate into the class and they participate. They give their opinions and provide lots of suggestions.


Margarita and her class assistant Abraham leading their Bioregionalismo students from the Genesis School. In the 
background, a large group of tricicleros (eco-taxi drivers) hold a weekly meeting. 

 

Photo by Clay Plager-Unger

We begin class by introducing each student and then reading from and talking about the Bioregionalismo book that was written by Planet Drum. Then we did a “dynamic” to stretch out a bit. The students will go home thinking about everything we did in class. They are happy, curious and have a lot of enthusiasm for learning.


Genesis students during class. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


Margarita teaching her class with Planet Drum and Peace Corps volunteers sitting in. 

 

Photo by Clay Plager-Unger

On Friday, we waited for the group in the usual meeting place: the Mothers’ Park. Two students missed class today, one because he went to visit his father and the other because of religious classes. At the beginning of the walk, we were shocked by how much garbage we saw going up the hill to the Cross Outlook. We saw how people there throw all of their trash on the ground and even around where Planet Drum has planted trees.


Bioregionalism students walking through town on their way 
to La Cruz during a fieldtrip. 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.


The three classes walk up to the Cruz during the first Friday 
of the program. Photo by 

 

Michelle Jensen.

Estefano Davila commented that the people there should be more conscious of their actions. Naomi Arauz suggested coming back to do a clean-up some day in order to show them how they could live somewhere cleaner. In the meantime, we left a sign that says ‘Don’t throw trash’ in order to try and help.

Continuing the field trip, we made various stops along the way up the hill to the Cross. We saw the different places where Planet Drum has planted trees. Orlando participated by identifying all of the different kinds of trees that had been planted. From the top we could see how beautiful our bioregion is. We gave some talks to the children and they played games. It was a very nice class.


Orlando and his daughter, one of the students, pose in 
front of an Algarrobo tree. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.

[Top]

<<<<><><>>>>

Fundación Planet Drum
Bioregionalismo
Mayo 2011
Profesor: Margarita Avila Napa

Hoy es el primer día de Bioregionalismo. Empezamos una nueva aventura este año. Estoy trabajando con los chicos del colegio Génesis. Sus edades son aproximadamente entre 13 a 15. Ellos ya son prácticamente adolescentes. Yo tengo dos cursos de Génesis a mi cargo lo de décimo año y bachillerato. Es un grupo excelente. ¿Y porqué es excelente? Porque ellos se integran en la clase, participan, opinan y dan muchas sugerencias.

Empezamos con la presentación de cada uno de nosotros y hablamos sobre el libro de Bioregionalismo entregado por la Fundación Planet Drum. Nosotros hicimos una dinámica. Todos lo que participamos en clase van a llevar a sus casas y se reflejarán. Los estudiantes tienen felicidad, curiosidad y muchas ganas de aprender.

El día viernes, esperamos al grupo en el lugar de siempre, “El Parque de las Madres”. Faltaban dos chicos, uno porque viajaba a ver su padre y el otro tenía una clase religiosa. Comenzamos el recorrido con mucha pena porque vimos que las personas alrededor de las escaleras de La Cruz botan toda su basura al piso, incluyendo alrededor de los árboles que ha sembrado Planet Drum.

Estefano Davila comentó que la gente debería tener más conciencia. Naomi Arauz opinó que podemos hacer una minga cualquier día de la semana para enseñar a los moradores ser un poco más limpios. Dejamos puesto un letrero que dice ‘No Bote Basura’ para concienciar a la gente por lo menos un poco.

A continuación del recorrido hicimos diferentes paradas para conocer los sitios sembrados por Planet Drum y pudimos ver lo hermoso que es nuestra bioregión desde arriba en la Cruz. Orlando compartió la clase mostrando todos los tipos de árboles que hemos sembrado hasta la actualidad. Dimos charlas y los estudiantes jugaron. Que linda que fue la clase.

[Top]

<<<<><><>>>>

Planet Drum Foundation
Bioregional Education Program
Report #1, June 2011
Teacher: David Mera Villareal

In the following report I, Professor David Mera Villareal, will explain the work that I have done with the Ninth Year students of the Nation High School ‘Fanny de Baird’ during the month of May.

In the first week we covered the basics of Bioregionalismo. We learned about the characteristics of a bioregion. The students became familiar with the materials and then shared their ideas and comments. On Friday we had the opportunity to observe all of the Bahía bioregion from above during the field trip that we took to the Cruz (Cross) hilltop look out.


David Mera, a new professor this year, 
watches over his students as they present what they’ve been learning. 

 

Photo by 
Clay Plager-Unger.

The second week we analyzed an article by Peter Berg, Planet Drum founder, where he explains the catastrophic environmental effects caused by human activity and the importance of raising peoples awareness in order to be able to stop and reverse this destructive process. We also learned about the environmental projects which are taking place in and around Bahía. The children drew a bioregional map of Bahía and a map of each of their neighborhoods. The children are very active in their participation and I am satisfied with their behavior. On Friday, we hiked to the overview in the Bellavista barrio[neighborhood]. From there we could see the ocean, Bahia, estuary, and surrounding forest; all of the ecosystems which form the Bahia bioregion.

The third week was successful due to the participation and work of the students. They studied the ‘steps to protect our bioregion.’ They organized themselves in groups to consider and answer questions relating to the necessities of life such as water, energy, waste, and culture. Afterwards, each group presented their work to the entire class. That Friday we took a field trip to the ‘Forest Amidst the Ruins.’ The children were very happy to explore the park. They listened to a presentation by Ramon about the history of the park and even planted some Guachepeli trees. We were accompanied by volunteers from Planet Drum and the Peace Corps.

During the fourth week, I gave the students an exam about Bioregionalismo and I was satisfied with their answers. They were able to demonstrate all that they had learned during the first month. 


Barre Luis Loor takes his Bioregionalism exam. 

 

Photo by 
Michelle Jensen.


Félix Pinargote and Samuel Verduga. 

 

Photo by Michelle Jensen.

That Friday we took a field trip to the Bellaca beach. We started walking from the park in Leonidas Plaza and hiked over a big hill to the ocean. Once there the children bathed in the water.

I am participating in this project for the first time this year, but I am sure that we have reached the goals that were set for our class during the first month.

Sincerely,

David Mera Villareal

[Top]

<<<<><><>>>>

Fundación Planet Drum
Bioregionalismo
Junio 2011
Profesor:  David Mera Villareal

Mediante el presente hago conocer a ustedes, que los estudiantes del Noveno Año de Educación Básica del Colegio Nacional Fanny de Baird, junto con mi persona Profesor David Mera Villareal, hemos trabajado durante el mes de mayo del presente sin inconveniente alguna.

En la primera semana se trató el tema de Bioregionalismo. Aprendimos sobre las características de una bioregión. Los estudiantes adquirieron los conocimientos y luego participaron con ideas y criterios propios. El viernes tuvimos la oportunidad de observar toda la bioregión de Bahía durante el recorrido que se organizó al Mirador la Cruz.

La segunda semana se analizó un artículo de Peter Berg, fundador de Planet Drum donde explica sobre los efectos catastróficos causados por actividades humanas en el planeta y la concienciación de las personas para parar y revertir este proceso destructivo. También se analizó los proyectos ambientales en torno de la eco-ciudad. Los estudiantes dibujaron un mapa bioregional de Bahía de Caráquez y un mapa de la comunidad en el que habita cada alumno. La participación de los estudiantes fue activa y muy satisfactoria. Después, hicimos el recorrido al Mirador de Bellavista incrementando nuestros conocimientos de la educación ambiental.

La tercera semana fue exitosa en cuanto a la participación y trabajo en grupo de los alumnos. Ellos estudiaron los pasos para proteger nuestra bioregión. Los alumnos se organizaron en grupos para analizar y contestar preguntas relacionadas a las necesidades de la vida como: alimentos, agua, energía, basura, cultura. Luego cada grupo presentó su trabajo a toda la clase. El viernes se realizó el recorrido por el Bosque en Medio de las Ruinas (María Auxiliadora). Los niños y jóvenes estuvieron muy contentos y felices al encontrarse con la naturaleza. Sembraron árboles de guachapelí y escucharon la charla sobre la historia del Bosque en Medio de las Ruinas que les dictó Ramón. Además estuvieron acompañados por voluntarios del cuerpo de paz y Planet Drum.

En la cuarta semana se tomó la evaluación sobre bioregionalismo a los alumnos. Ellos respondieron las preguntas de manera satisfactoria y demostraron lo aprendido en el primer mes de clase. El viernes, hicimos el recorrido hacia la playa Punta Bellaca. Fuimos caminando desde el Parque Leonidas Plaza, hasta dicha playa, los alumnos se divirtieron y disfrutaron de un baño en el mar.

Yo, David Mera, en este año recién me inicio en este proyecto, y estoy seguro que hemos alcanzado el objetivo que nos hemos propuesto para el primer mes. Es todo cuanto puedo informar, para los fines pertinentes.

Atentamente

Lcdo. David Mera Villareal

[Top]

<<<<><><>>>>

(Click here for next Set of Reports)